ART TERMS

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FOUND OBJECT — A found object, in an artistic sense, indicates the use of an object which has not been designed for an artistic purpose, but which exists for another purpose already. Found objects may exist either as utilitarian, manufactured items, or things (including, at times, dead bodies) which occur in nature. In both cases the objects are discovered by the artist or musician to be capable of being employed in an artistic way, and are designated as "found" to distinguish them from purposely created items used in the art forms.

FOUND ART — The term found art—more commonly found object (French: objet trouvé) or readymade—describes art created from the undisguised, but often modified, use of objects that are not normally considered art, often because they already have a mundane, utilitarian function.

Found art derives significance from the designation placed upon it by the artist. The context into which it is placed (e.g. a gallery or museum) is usually also a highly relevant factor. The idea of dignifying commonplace objects in this way was originally a shocking challenge to the accepted distinction between what was considered art as opposed to not art.

Found art, however, has to have the artist's input, at the very least an idea about it, i.e. the artist's designation of the object as art, which is nearly always reinforced with a title. There is mostly also some degree of modification of the object, although not to the extent that it cannot be recognised. The modification may lead to it being designated a "modified", "interpreted" or "adapted" found object.

ASSEMBLAGE ART — Assemblage is an artistic process in which a three-dimensional artistic composition is made from putting together found objects.

Assemblage is the 3-dimensional cousin of collage... being made up of preformed natural or manufactured materials, objects, or fragments not intended as art materials.

MIXED MEDIA — Mixed media, in visual art, refers to an artwork in the making of which more than one medium has been employed.

There is an important distinction between "mixed media" artworks and "multimedia art". Mixed media tends to refer to a work of visual art that combines various traditionally distinct visual art media. The term multimedia art implies a broader scope than mixed media, combining visual art with non-visual elements (such as recorded sound, for example) or with elements of the other arts (such as literature, drama, dance, motion graphics, music, or interactivity).

Many interesting effects can be achieved by using mixed media. Often, found objects are used in conjunction with traditional artist mediums, such as paints and graphite, to express a meaning in the everyday life. In this manner, many different elements of art become more flexible than with traditional artist mediums.

SCULPTURE — A sculpture is a three-dimensional object, which for the purposes of this object is man-made and selected for special recognition as art.


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found object art
by gary carlson
geneva, ny

 
all you can eat
ant farm 1.2.3.4.
babies in peril
ballerina
bat boy
black lagoon
born to be green
burka
contrary (hammerhead)
crossed signals
expanding foam
frankenbambi
ima sturnbich
in the box
judgment day
low maint pet
man bites dog
mastodon
nell's nightmare
quicksand
roundheads and flatheads
shamrock theater
snapper
tarpit
terror from the deep
triptych in walnuts
voodoo quadruped pelvises
vulture
wait a minute - where's the baby?
untitled (enigmatic figure)
untitled (galloping figure)

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